9 mistakes you make without knowing it while washing your hair

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Shampoo-rinse-conditioner-rinse. It sounds so simple. But it’s not enough to have shiny, healthy hair. Experts in the hair care industry share their secrets for washing hair well.

washing your hair
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You use the wrong shampoo.

The wrong shampoo can starve your dry hair of essential moisture or leave you are excellent hair flat. Anabel Kingsley, trichologist at Philip Kinsley, tells Prevention, that it should be chosen according to the texture of your hair rather than according to its type. The surface can be beautiful, medium, thick, or Afro-Caribbean. “We use a mild, protein-rich shampoo for fine hair to give it body,” she says. With thick hair, we choose moisturizing and softening agents that make them supple, smooth to style, and without the frizz. Do you find that confusing? Ask your hairdresser for advice, suggests Kate Jotzat, master colorist and stylist at Chroma K8 Beautique in Chicago. “He will advise you on what is best for your hair according to your lifestyle,” she adds.

You don’t brush them before you wash them.

You comb your hair after washing, but what do you do before? Taking a minute to brush them off before shampooing removes all product residue and prevents them from tangling in the shower.

You could refine your washing technique.

Wash your hair from the top to the tips, advises Yasmine Ishmael, chief scientist for the NIUCOCO vegan haircare range. “Most people apply their shampoo to the roots and lather before adding to the rest of the hair,” she says. Instead, apply the shampoo to the scalp and lather.

Then work the product to the tips without adding shampoo. “Since hair tends to get dirtier at the root and drier in the tips, this technique allows you to hydrate those dry ends,” she adds.

Your shampoo contains irritating chemicals.

Yasmine Ishmael names sodium lauryl sulfate, sodium Laureth sulfate, synthetic fragrances, ammonia, and bleach, all of which are chemical irritants to avoid in your hair product choices. These compounds can strip your hair of their natural oils, irritate the scalp and increase the formation of split and broken ends. They can also damage your beautiful color, which costs you the eyes of the head.

You lift your hair to wash it.

“It really is not recommended, and it will only create knots,” says Yasmine Ishmael. For her part, Kate Jotzat says that she avoids handling her hair when she is washing it. (Completely forget the hair ridges in the shampoo of your childhood!) She advises her clients to remove them by letting them fall naturally so that the cuticles stay flat and your hair is soft and supple. Discover the confessions that your hairdresser has not confessed to you.

You wash them too often.

Kate Jotzat and Jasmine Ishmael both determine the frequency of shampoos depending on the type of hair. When they are oily, a daily shampoo may be necessary, as well as the addition of dry shampoo. “It absorbs sebum and gives body to your hair,” says Jasmine Ishmael. For healthy hair, two to three shampoos per week are usually enough. “You have to find the right balance between washing and hydration,” says Kate Jotzat. If your hair is dry or damaged, just one shampoo a week might be the best way to achieve this balance.

You go too hard on the conditioner.

We understand that you wanted healthy hair, but overdoing the conditioner may not be the answer. “Always apply the conditioner from the tips to the roots,” advises Yasmine Ishmael. “For normal or oily hair, stop halfway down to avoid weighing down the roots. »Are they dry or thick? “Apply conditioner down to the roots, because it’s essential to nourish dry hair. ”

You wash them too often.

Kate Jotzat and Jasmine Ishmael both determine the frequency of shampoos depending on the type of hair. When they are oily, a daily shampoo may be necessary, as well as the addition of dry shampoo. “It absorbs sebum and gives body to your hair,” says Jasmine Ishmael. For healthy hair, two to three shampoos per week are usually enough. “You have to find the right balance between washing and hydration,” says Kate Jotzat. If your hair is dry or damaged, just one shampoo a week might be the best way to achieve this balance.

You’re addicted to deep conditioners.

We generally shouldn’t give more than one in-depth treatment a month, says Kate Jotzat. This can vary from person to person, depending on the condition of the hair. It is best to consult your hairdresser for tailor-made advice or try one of these.